Jen Richards

Wildlife artist


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Cephalopod Awareness Days 2016

It’s the most wunderful time of the year: Cephalopod Awareness Days! October 8th-12th is the time to celebrate the world’s most intelligent invertebrates. Established in 2007 by The Octopus News Magazine Online (TONMO), Cephalopod Awareness Days are a way to bring awareness to the diversity, conservation and biology of octopuses (October 8th), nautilids (October 9th), cuttlefishes and squid (October 10th), cephalopods in legends and popular culture (October 11th) and their ancient relatives (October 12th).

If you’ve been following me for a while you already know I have a weakness for cephalopods (especially cuttlefish!), so I drew a colouring page featuring the four extant types to celebrate. Please feel free to download it, print it, share it, enjoy it, and use it to spread the love of some of the coolest creatures on the planet – all I ask is that you do not remove my website link from the image. Click on the link below the image preview to get your free PDF, and colour away to your three hearts’* content!

Download colouring page here!

*Did you know cephalopods have three hearts? All the more to love.


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CITES CoP17

In Johannesburg right now, the 17th CITES Conference of the Parties (#CoP17) is taking place. From September 23rd to October 5th, over 2000 government representatives from all over the world will decide which species will see new international protection. You might remember the 16th CoP, which was a huge success for sharks and rays – the number of elasmobranch species listed under Appendix II increased from three to eight. There’s still a long way to go.

This year there are proposals for several more sharks and rays to be listed: all thresher sharks, all mobula rays, the silky shark and the ocellate river stingray. I couldn’t resist drawing a little show of support. Best wishes to all who are currently in South Africa fighting to conserve sharks, rays, and so many other animals and plants!


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I regret nothing

I make no secret of the fact that I love both sharks and puns. Whenever I can mix the two, it’s a good day… and leads me to do things like this:

Where ya from, you cartilaginous thing?

Where ya from, you cartilaginous thing?

Because zebra sharks (and others) breathe using their spiracles… which is funny because it rhymes with… anyway. It got stuck in my head and now it’s probably in yours too. Sorry!

For those of you who also like to have a giggle at nerdy ocean puns, this is available on shirts, mugs and stickers over in my design shop!

 


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A6

striderIn the late 90s my school held a tabletop sale in the local town hall. 12-year-old-me ran a table to raise funds for whales and dolphins and to cover the cost of my first orca adoption. I already knew exactly which one it would be.

A6, also known as Strider, was an adult male in the northern resident community of orcas and the eldest offspring of A30 (Tsitika). Her matriline continues today. Born in 1964, he was often seen with his two brothers A38 (Blackney) and A39 (Pointer — I later adopted him too), and I still find photos of their three huge dorsal fins as they traveled together in books today.  (Here’s a good link from 2007 with ID photos of the A30 matriline).

A38 (Blackney), A30 (Tsitika), A50 (Clio), A6 (Strider), A39 (Pointer)

A38 (Blackney), A30 (Tsitika), A50 (Clio), A6 (Strider), A39 (Pointer)

I remember the morning the newsletter arrived a few years later that told of his absence and presumed death. I was devastated. It was Strider that helped me connect with wild orcas from almost 5,000 miles away and it’s his fin that’s still etched in my memory; that notch in the upper third was so distinctive he became the first individual orca I ever learnt to recognise. In a lot of ways he’s still somewhat of an inspiration to me. I have his dorsal ID photo above my desk in the office and the postcard I was sent with the adoption certificate is on the wall of my studio almost 20 years later.

It’s odd, then, that I never really drew him until now. I’ve been planning out a large painting featuring a particular group of orcas with even more distinctive dorsal fins (I’m sharing the progress from thumbnail stage on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook) and it got me thinking about Strider. I just wanted to do a simple ink drawing with stippling to highlight his silhouette. I’d love to do a proper piece featuring him and his brothers soon.strider_wm