Jen Richards

Wildlife artist


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More sharks!

Three pages in and I’m definitely addicted to using this toned grey sketchbook with a ballpoint pen, white pencil and a white gel pen. Here are two sharks I did this week:White shark

Whale shark

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Atlantic sea nettle

White pencil, gel pen and biro on toned grey paper.

White pencil, gel pen and biro on toned grey paper.

I’ve admired the work of artist Aaron Blaise for a while now, both for his incredibly diverse style as well as how beautiful even the most simple sketch can be. Inspired by his utterly gorgeous sketches on toned paper I thought I’d have a go myself, and used a white pencil, gel pen and a biro to draw an Atlantic sea nettle. It was really enjoyable, and definitely something I’m going to do more of!


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Makana

Acrylic on canvas, 11 x 14

Acrylic on canvas, 11 x 14

I'm impressed I could contain my geek out even this much.

I’m impressed I could contain my geek out even this much.

Last month I fulfilled a long term goal of mine: visiting the Monterey Bay Aquarium. I’ve been an admirer of the incredible work that goes on there for years and was beyond excited to finally be setting foot inside the building for real (they’re lucky I didn’t somehow manage to fit those life-sized orca models in my bag upon leaving). It exceeded all my expectations – what an amazing team, collection and facility! I even got to see humpback whales, sea otters and seemingly endless seabirds from the deck.

I gathered so many references for future works of species I’d longed to see, like leopard sharks, flamboyant cuttlefish and bluefin tuna (just to name a few), but was particularly inspired by meeting a very special bird named Makana. She’s a Laysan albatross from Hawaii that suffered a wing injury and cannot be released, so she serves as an ambassador for seabirds at Monterey. This role is particularly important because of the threats seabirds, especially albatrosses like Makana, face in the ocean from plastic pollution. This video does a lovely job of introducing Makana and sharing this critical message. It’s also worth nothing that of the 21 albatross species, 19 are threatened or endangered.

Given my love of seabirds I couldn’t resist painting an 11 x 14 portrait of Makana. I’ve long been fascinated with albatrosses for their size and lifestyle – they can go years without touching land and it’s believed they can even sleep while flying! This painting is now in its forever home in California and I’m thankful to have met such a special bird. Thank you Makana and Monterey!

Isn't she beautiful?

Isn’t she beautiful?

For more about Laysan albatrosses and the problem with plastics, check out the Smithsonian’s Ocean Portal. To become smitten with these birds yourself (and I definitely recommend a visit to see Makana for yourself), take a look at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s live nest cam!


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Something spontaneous

Acrylics on 5 x 7 canvas panel

Acrylics on 5 x 7 canvas panel

As always, orcas take over everything I do...

As always, orcas take over everything I do…

Sometimes you just get the urge to paint something that makes you happy. For me, earlier this week, it was a curious little orca on a tiny 5″ x 7″ canvas panel that took about two hours from start to finish. It’s based on a quick sketch I did the night before while I was actually trying to practice some tigers (I’d spent the day gathering reference at the zoo), and I couldn’t get it out of my mind until I painted it. I need to do more spontaneous pieces like this.


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The Bower Pod – Commission

Acrylic on 9 x 12 wood panel

Acrylic on 9 x 12 wood panel

This was a REALLY fun commission I did recently! My client’s sister, who loves orcas (good taste), and her husband had a baby boy and the idea was to create a kind of “family portrait” featuring orcas in time for Mother’s Day. I decided to paint it directly onto a 9 x 12 inch wood panel (like a previous piece) to allow for some interesting textures and a more stylised look. I did this by doing a couple coats of a light blue-grey wash directly over my pencil lines so that the wood grain would still show through. Then it was just a case of working on the whales! One of the notes that my client gave, and one I wholeheartedly embraced, was to ensure the calf had the yellow hue typical of newborns. (We’re all cetacean nerds here.)

I’m glad to report that this gift was very happily received! I’m always happy to spread the orca love. If you’re interested in a commission like this, please feel welcome to contact me.